3 Ways to Planning Events w/Intentionality

3 Ways to Planning Events w/Intentionality

The Student Ministry Calendar is extremely busy, especially compared to all other ministries in the church.  It can be exhausting just looking at a yearly or even a summer student ministry calendar.  You have outreach events, discipleship events, community events, worship events, serving events, camps, retreats, mission trips, and then you multiply all of that by two if you have separate Middle School & High School Ministries.

The question becomes, is it necessary to have a jam-packed calendar full of events, trips, and programming?

I bet we would be surprised by how many of us don’t even ask this question.  We just pack our calendars full of things, because that’s what we do, or in all honesty, we don’t realize we’re packing them this full.  We put an event here, and a trip there, surrounded by programs, and the next thing we know, we’re gone four nights out of the week or two weeks out of the month.  When we examine a couple of things, we can plan our ministries with more intentionality.  We should always be asking, 1) Why do we do the events, trips, programs we do, and 2) Is there a better, more efficient way to do what we currently do?

I believe when we ask these questions, we can come up with three solutions to be more intentional, efficient, and impactful:

  • 1.  Combine events to maximize impact.

Combining events can surprisingly be very advantageous to, not just you, but your volunteers, students, and parents.  For some reason, we get so focused on having “outreach” events that we lose sight of why we do outreach events.  For instance, I plan a huge water wars night designed to get the masses through the doors of our church.  We don’t do worship, teaching, or anything like that, because this is an outreach event, not a worship/discipleship event.  My goal of the night is to collect all of the new people’s information, and make sure they are invited back to said worship/discipleship event or maybe a normal programming night.  The problem with this, is a very small percentage, or maybe a fraction of a percentage would actually come back to a normal programming night.  After all, they came for the fun, so where is the drawback to a “non-fun” night.

Combining events will put fun AND focus all in one event, without having to figure out how to get students back for something more meaningful.

What happens when you combine events, especially in the summer when you have more time, is it puts fun and focus all in one day/night.  Maybe it’s once a month, attaching an After Party to a Wednesday night service.  Do your normal program, but then have food and fun that follows.  This would double your timeframe, but when you do it once a month in the summer, it’s really not a big deal.  You could do things on campus, like dodgeball tournament, water wars, nerf wars, or things off campus, like bowling, trampoline park, swimming, etc.  What you’ll find is, you skip the step of trying to get people to come back to your program, because they are already there, waiting for your After Party!  Our motto this summer has been, “Come for Jesus, stay for the after party.”  Usually it’s the other way around, and they don’t end up staying.

  • 2.  Know the difference between utilizing momentum and over-scheduling.

Sometimes, it’s actually smart to schedule multiple things in a week when you’re coming off of a momentum-producing event or trip.  But often, we are simply over-scheduling.  When we step back and take a birds-eye look at our calendar, there are many random events with no purpose or meaning behind them, other than another night away from home for all, with little fruit to show.  When we schedule heavy around momentum-producing events, and light elsewhere, we begin to see, not only more fruit, but more excitement around events.  Often times, stand-alone events become pretty ho-hum.

I always like to start big and end big, with students hungry for more in between.

End the summer with a big event, take a couple weeks off, then come back with a big kick-off event for the fall.  To me, when students are hungry for more, it typically means we are doing well with the events we are doing, and not over-scheduling.

  • 3.  Utilize resources from other ministries.

Typically, churches have multiple ministries doing the same ministry.  In other words, there may be Children’s Worship, Student Worship, and Adult Worship Ministries, Children’s, Student, and Adult Small Group Ministries, etc.  Why not pool resources and help each other out?  Granted, some things need to be separated, but sometimes we are duplicating events unnecessarily.  There could be huge benefits to doing a church-wide small group leader training event, with age-specific breakouts.  Or using your adult worship ministries to train and mentor your student worship team(s).  This way, we are resourcing more efficiently while showing the congregation that we are one team going in one direction.

Typically, churches have multiple ministries doing the same ministry…why not pool resources and help each other out?

I believe that when we schedule with momentum, combine events for greater impact, and utilize resources from other ministries, our planning will be much more intentional and deliver a greater punch overall.

Have you seen planning be more effective using any of the about 3 solutions?

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4 Keys to Help Students Transition into Your Ministry

keysTransitioning in life is never easy, no matter what the transition.  While it may be exciting, it doesn’t mean there aren’t challenges.  Think of all the transitions you go through in life:  starting school, changing schools, going to college, starting new jobs, getting married, having kids, changing jobs, changing positions in jobs.

Some of the many transitions in life happens in the teenage years.  Not only do new 6th graders change schools, but they change ministries in the church as well.  And sometimes, going from Children’s Ministry to Middle School Ministry might be scarier than actually changing schools!

Here are 4 key things to do when preparing for a healthy & exciting transition.  This can also apply transitioning 8th graders to the High School Ministry if your Middle School & High School ministries are separate.  Or if you don’t transition until 7th grade, just substitute 6th grade for 7th.

1.  Work with Children’s Ministry Team.

  • Too often on church staffs, each ministry is a silo, keeping their head down and doing their own thing.  While it’s true we have been hired to lead a specific ministry, it’s crucial to keep the big picture in mind.  We are part of an entire team.  Just like on a baseball team, you may play shortstop, but you are practicing, meeting with, and encouraging the entire team in order to win.  You may have played a flawless game at shortstop, but if your team loses, what’s the point?  Sometimes, we’re so laser-focused on our ministry, that we lose sight of everything else.  I believe each ministry should be contributing to the overall health of the church.  Student Ministry staff should meet regularly with Children’s Ministry staff in order to ensure a healthy transition plan for incoming 6th graders.  This is a big reason Orange is such a great tool for cohesive curriculum.  Children’s Pastors should portray excitement about 6th graders moving up and talk up and about Student Ministry often.

    It’s about receiving students well, and handing them off well.

    And Student Pastors should…

2.  Make yourself available to Children’s Ministry.

  • Serve in Children’s Ministry!  I’m not saying you need to be in there weekly, but make yourself known to the kids.  When it’s time for them to transition, at least they will know who will be leading them next, and you’re a familiar face.  Offer to teach a lesson everyone once-in-while, go to a pre-teen event, like SuperStart, help out at VBS, or heck, just set up chairs and high-five kids as they come in!  Like I said, you don’t need to be at everything, but

    having a presence in Children’s Ministry breaks down ministry barriers and starts the relationship-building early.

3.  Treat the incoming 6th graders special.

  • It’s a big deal going from 5th grade to 6th grade.  Make it one!  This may mean:  1) moving them up at the beginning of the summer, so they can actually be and feel like a 6th grader before school starts.  2) Pull them out of Children’s Ministry a couple of times in the spring to “orientate” them by bringing them into a student service or class.  3) Throw a party!  Do some kind of welcome party for them, where you can focus your time on them and get to know them while having fun.

    It’s a big deal going from 5th grade to 6th grade.  Make it one!

4.  Meet with the parents.

  • This is a big one!  Establishing relationships with parents needs to start early, or the next thing you know, they’re juniors and you’ve never met mom or dad.  This also emphasizes your desire to partner with them to help spiritually lead their teenagers, because that’s what it’s all about.  Send a letter to parents in the Spring preparing them for the transition.  Invite them to a Student Ministry Orientation or a Student Ministry Open House so they can get to know you, your leaders, and your programming.  Maybe stand at the entrance to your Children’s Ministry on Sunday mornings, and meet them as they drop of their kids.  Have information to give them. There are so many questions when it comes to transitioning to a new ministry, and having answers on paper helps parents put the pieces together.  Whatever you do, you can never do too much to connect with parents.

    If we truly want to partner with parents, we must create many connections with them.

Transitions in life can be scary, let’s do everything we can to make them more exciting in Student Ministry